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Death Education and the School of Hard Knocks

March 18th, 2014 by judytalks

As I look through my blogs and articles material, I realize I’ve covered many aspects of grief and loss. I began writing about grief following the death of my husband. My first book, No Time to Grieve A Survivor’s Guide to Loss and Healing, was taken from my journal, and documented the struggle I experienced finding answers and support. A Child’s Grief Surviving the Death of a Parent, resulted from personal experience – my own and others – and general research. I began giving seminars, writing articles, and doing radio interviews shortly after, and have gathered considerable information on this important aspect of life.
In our society, death education usually comes after the fact. Though there are classes on various topics concerning dying and bereavement, most of us learn how to help ourselves and others the hard way – through personal experience, when emotions are out of bounds and cognitive abilities are diminished. It doesn’t have to be that way.
It’s safe to say nearly everyone will face the death of a loved one and need comfort and support. We also find ourselves in a position of wanting and needing to help someone else to cope with a loss. As a writer and educator, I love to teach. My website displays my books with a synopsis you may read. My blog appears there and on Authors Den and Good Reads. My articles may be read on the website and also on www.ezinearticles.com and www.scribd.com. If you haven’t checked them out, please be my guest.
My current writing project is in full swing. Longer articles and little e-books are in the making and will appear on Kindle. More informative, these additions to my teaching tools will give you the knowledge you need when you want to reach out with comfort and support to a grieving friend. You don’t need a Kindle to read them. For $0.99, they can be downloaded and read on your computer, or printed out.
My work as a grief facilitator with children and the Flying Solo group I started for adults has taught me the importance of giving clear, honest, reliable tools for everyday use. Death knocks on every door, and when it does, a solid foundation for healing begins with confidence and knowledge. Whether you need comfort for yourself or for a friend, your death education can begin now.
I wish you well,
Judy

How to Help A Grieving Child

June 6th, 2013 by judytalks

Everyone wants to give comfort and support to those we know who have lost a loved one, regardless of their age. Knowing how to help a child is often difficult, because the child can’t always express the hurt and confusion they feel.

I feel privileged to be able to bring relevant information to you on a radio network that is dedicated to the needs of children. I will be discussing important aspects of connecting, comforting, and supporting children in mourning, with practical ideas that work.

My interview is scheduled for Monday, June 10, 2013 at 10:30 CST. Dr. James Sutton, psychologist and host, will be talking with me, so please check out the website, www.thechangingbehaviornetwork.com to see when you can hear the interview. A copy of my book, A Child’s Grief Surviving the Death of a Parent, will be given away in a drawing, and I’ll be offering a free PDF Booklet on the subject of SeniorCare.

I would be pleased to have you listen to the interview. When adults connect with a grieving child, the healing process can follow.

Kindest regards,
Judy

Do You Hear What I Hear?

December 7th, 2012 by judytalks

It’s the season to be jolly – and busy – the time of year when everyone spreads good cheer. Busy people are sometimes grumpy people, but this year I’m hearing sounds of laughter, singing in malls, offers of helpfulness, and acknowledgement of the simple pleasures of the season.

I’m a grief writer, so I’m always concerned about those who have lost a loved one, and find the Holidays difficult. There are many good ideas for giving yourself or someone else comfort while also celebrating with friends and family. There are articles on various websites, including mine, that offer personal ways to experience joy along with some sadness. Here are a few ideas to get you started.

This year, start a new tradition or gift of giving in your loved one’s name.
Make or buy an ornament with the person’s name and/or picture for the tree.
Write a letter or card, telling that person how much they are missed.

Remember that the Holidays will never be quite the same, but your celebration needn’t be without peace or joy. Memories are bittersweet. Have a gift under the tree for your loved one, and one for yourself from him or her. Love doesn’t die. Nurture your spirit and the spirit of the Holiday.

Season’s Greetings,
Judy

The Year In Review

January 11th, 2012 by judytalks

I looked back over my posts of the past year and realized I set some important goals, particularly about learning and giving more. I have certainly learned much in 2011, not just about the grieving community, but about managing loss in whatever size and shape it appears.

Loss and change are household words for almost everyone. They characterized America, challenged problem-solving skills, and drove fear into the hearts of all ages.

My family was certainly not spared, but we have not only survived, but begun to thrive in some important areas of life. No, no one’s making a lot of money, but we supported, commiserated, and advised one another as the economic axe fell a few times.

I’m old enough to know that life’s a bumpy road, so you better have a strong stomach. What inspires me is the growth of neighborliness, the determination to reinvent the wheel, and the charm of people laughing at what is clearly a headache in their daily lives.

I wrote a great deal in 2011, including Kindle downloads, articles, blog posts, and outlines for more of the same. The grieving community is looking for information to understand and ease the pain of losses of all kinds. I hope to continue meeting those needs.

Learn More Write More Give More
It connects and fulfills.

To a satisfying New Year,
Judy

Life-giving Nutrients

September 18th, 2011 by judytalks

What nourishes you? What keeps you healthy, helps you to grow, and piques your sense of satisfaction?

Food for mind, body, and spirit are different in kind but have similar components. What you take in should nourish you, do you no harm, leave you feeling well, and satisfy your hunger.

We have some control over what we feed our bodies. We can make choices from an abundance of foods, some of which will not meet the criteria mentioned. But what about nourishing your mind and spirit?

There’s a saying, “Do you eat to live or live to eat?” Hopefully, you do both. There’s health and joy in that.

I take great care to eat only foods that are good for me. Staying well is mandatory. But lately I’ve given thought to what I allow to seep into my mind and spirit. Junk food abounds. Empty calories, toxic ideas, corrosive opinions, and just plain “spoiled food” surrounds us day and night. Time to take control over what I feed myself.

It’s hard to stop eating potato chips when you crave salt. It’s also hard to stop watching junk TV when you want to relax. It’s difficult to walk away from conversations that give you a belly ache instead of inspiration. Reading, always a great pleasure for me, should also meet your standards for quality. When you realize you’re always hungry for intellectual stimulation or a soothing of the soul, it’s probably time for a change.

I’m composing a “diet” especially designed to nourish my mind and spirit as carefully as I choose foods for my body. My hunger for health and well-being in all aspects of life is not being fed. Time to act. I can make better choices. No more junk food. Period!

Be well,

Judy

A Time to Tweak

June 29th, 2011 by judytalks

Awhile ago I wrote about developing a marketing plan for my latest book. (see The Year of Magical Planning). For the most part, that plan has given me opportunities for reaching the grieving community with comfort and support. Recently, though, I’ve tweaked it to give myself larger chunks of time for covering the ongoing aspects of bereavement. Mourning doesn’t start and stop at fixed points. The papers I’m writing are posted on www.scribd.com under judywriting and will be continued in a series. These papers help you to manage the difficulties of grief, while taking care of your inner self. Many thanks to you who have already checked them out.

Taking joy in your work has to allow times for tweaking. A fresh approach, a new idea, or a newly discovered avenue for reaching your audience renews your spirit and keeps you on your toes.

Please visit my website, www. survive-strong.com for resources that offer you comfort and hope. I wish you well.

Judy

A Jog in the Road

June 10th, 2011 by judytalks

I’m slow to change and not a big risk taker. My habit is to take an idea through a rigorous test run of study, research, thought, and discussion with friends and family before embarking on projects. I used this strategy to forage into the world of epublishing. Not long after the publication of my first book, I submitted an article to EzineArticles to see what would happen. I wanted to present information on my subjects – grief and loss- in smaller, more focused pieces. I continued to write articles, submitting also to Article_Niche, but did so very gradually. Occasionally, I would check the stats to see how I was doing. Awhile ago I realized that I was getting a lot of hits.

Two things, in particular, struck me: People are looking for information on these subjects in greater numbers than I thought, and I could reach people with just what they needed to know in a short, concise article.

I have seen the jog in the road, and decided to take it. Whereas I intended to devote most of my time to writing books and publishing with my excellent publisher, I have begun to split that time to include larger chunks for writing articles and short papers that deliver answers and content that meet specific, immediate needs.

I discovered Scribd through a handout at a Book Fair and have posted two free pieces. I also plan to give Kindle a good look. Sometimes the jog in the road turns out to have remarkable potential.

Happy weekend.
Judy

Time to Reflect

May 31st, 2011 by judytalks

My quiet time has been a staple in my life for many years. Setting aside a designated time and place for unwinding and reflecting on what’s happening is food for my soul, and as necessary as food for the body. When I start to neglect it, I begin to starve.

May has always seemed to be the busiest month of the year, and this May has been no different. Commitments to wrap up, plans to make, problems to wrangle with and just daily living got me off my routine. And somehow when I neglect myself, I also lose track of the important people in my life. I disconnect.

I have a firm belief that we are all connected to one another in some way, but especially to those people we love. A disconnection has to be remedied immediately.

Reinstating my quiet time has restored my balance and allowed me to get back on track. My fuzzy focus is gone and I am prioritizing the things I really value.

My commitment to comfort and the grieving community is taking a new but solid approach with writing ideas and a positive spirit. My work with New Song has been uplifting and my plans for reaching more people are taking shape.

My mind works better when I clear out the cobwebs and delete the junk mail I’ve accumulated. Here’s to a better brain.

Judy

The Year of Magical Planning

March 12th, 2011 by judytalks

A Child’s Grief was published in January, 2010. Even before the manuscript was edited, I began putting together a marketing plan that would inform and encourage grievers and those who help them to become educated about death, grief and loss.

To date, I have reached many, many people. Groups, organizations, in-person discussions, and online social networking has spread the notion that death education doesn’t have to come after the fact in our society. We can learn how to help ourselves and others.

I am gratified to see more openness on this subject, more willingness to talk and listen, more groups and centers that address all the aspects of recovery and healing.

My recent 1st place book award from Reader Views 2010 Book Award contest has given me pleasure and encouragement that I am living my passion. Keeping you informed about bereavement is my heart’s desire, motivated first because I am a survivor, then, as an educator and writer. My most recent endeavor, to become a grief facilitator for grieving children and families strengthens my resolve to forge ahead.

Please avail yourself of the resources on these personal and important subjects on my website, www.survive-strong.com. When trauma strikes, the more you know before hand, the better you will emerge from the awfulness that is mourning. I wish you well.

Judy

Priorities

January 13th, 2009 by judytalks

A large part of my life is about writing, books, and communicating. My second book came back from my editor with very helpful suggestions for improving the overall quality of my work.
I write on the subject of grief, loss, and the courage to grow. The Holidays are difficult for those who are grieving, but the New Year can bring a fresh outlook and some wonderful tools for moving forward at your own pace. The key is for you to take charge.
The comfort of friends and family often eases the pain of loss this time of year. As I talk with people, I have learned that, though it’s difficult to celebrate, the warmth of traditions and special remembrances gives the spirit a lift.
Whatever you resolve to do or change this New Year, remember to follow your heart and look inside yourself for your own wisdom and truth.

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